Day 20 – Harlingen, Littenseradiel, Súdwest-Fryslân, Gaasterlân-Sleat, Skarsterlân, Lemsterland

Day two. I woke up to a lot of hail, and the morning dew frozen to my motorcycle. The tent was still moist, but it would take another 6 hours or so to get some proper (winter) temperatures and for the air to be dry.

Being the only camper on the camping, especially in this time of the year, the personnel was not prepared to me checking out. While the staff was finding out how to check out guests, I had some breakfast. With finishing my hot chocolate, I was on my way again.

Harlingen

Even though Harlingen has only a bit over 14k inhabitants, it is still the 4th biggest town in Friesland. The city gained its town priveleges in 1234, and is therefore even older than Amsterdam.

Interesting are the canal districts and the fortifications in the centre of Harlingen.

IMG_5460_harlingen

Littenseradiel

Another typical Frisian municipality with many small ‘hamlets’, canals, ditches and other watercourses

IMG_5464_littenseradiel

Súdwest-Fryslân

In terms of surface, both land and water, Súdwest-Fryslân is the largest municipality. The municipality is even larger now in 2014, since the municipality Boarnsterhim (which I visited on day one) joined Súdwest-Fryslân in January. In the near future also some towns of Littenseradiel will join this giant municipality.

Gaasterlan-Sleat

Gaasterlan-Sleat is only one of the many Frisian municipalities that arised after the 1984 merges. 20 years later, many of these ‘new’ municipalities again fall victim to the urge of fusing the local authorities.

IMG_5512_gaesterlansleat

Skarsterlân

This town hall is located in a park, which looked really nice.

Skarsterlân’s main city is Joure, famous and inextricably linked to Douwe Egberts, a multinational coffee and tea company, because there they had their first store.

IMG_5515_friesemeren

Lemsterland

IMG_5528_lemsterland


km: 280
km total: 4599
done: 6 (123)
to do: 292

KML-LogoFullscreen-Logo
Trip 19 FR

loading map - please wait...

Boarnsterhim: 53.095933, 5.834387
Heereveen: 52.961551, 5.920902
Leeuwarden: 53.202229, 5.796034
Gaasterlân-Sleat: 52.970399, 5.790391
Súdwest-Fryslân: 53.032497, 5.659043
Skarsterlân: 52.898839, 5.583474
Weststellingerwerf: 52.876321, 6.006827
Harlingen: 53.175066, 5.417971
Lemsterland: 52.844065, 5.711644
Leeuwarderadeel: 53.260631, 5.758453
Ferwerderadiel: 53.337674, 5.823678
Het Bildt: 53.277281, 5.661588
Menameradiel: 53.217420, 5.661253
Franekeradeel: 53.184876, 5.531771
Littenseradiel: 53.107787, 5.588033
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Menameradiel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Harlingen
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Súdwest-Fryslân
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Lemsterland
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Littenseradiel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Skarsterlân
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Gaasterlân-Sleat
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Weststellingerwerf
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Heereveen
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Boarnsterhim
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Leeuwarden
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Leeuwarderadeel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Ferwerderadiel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Het Bildt
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Franekeradeel

Day 19 – Weststellingwerf, Heereveen, Boarnsterhim, Leeuwarden, Leeuwarderadeel, Ferwerderadiel, Het Bildt, Menameradiel, Franekeradeel

Looking back at these pictures of a year ago is actually quite fun. It was actually quite difficult to find a camping that was open for campers in the off-season. Although the winter of 2013/2014 was relatively soft, no real cold or decent amounts of snow, this winter seems to be even warmer. The photos show a nice blue sky, but when I woke up in the morning, there were little ice pellets measuring over 6mm all around the tent. The sleeping bag (Ayacucho Ignition 1700) and inflatable sleeping pad (Exped Synmat 7M) I bought on my way to Weststellingerwerf have proven to be a good buy.

Weststellingwerf

Today and tomorrow are going to be all about the western Frisian municipalities. In Weststellingwerf they apparently have a Low Saxon dialect, Stellingwerfs, acknowledged by the government. It partly originated in the Society of Humanitarianism, a private organisation set up in 1818 to help poor families by granting them farming land. My grandmother and late grandfather lived there when they were young, so I’ve heard many stories about the organisation and about the conditions in which they lived there. Many times I’ve been to the museums and graveyards there, involuntarily unfortunately. But now, whenever I hear something of it in a different context, I cannot help but think that such an organisation to help the poor is not feasible anymore to maintain, and that’s a pity.

IMG_5364_weststellingerwerf

Heereveen

I personally know Heereveen mostly from its ice arena Thialf, being one of the fastest tracks in the world. And reminisce about the times when there were parties with over 18k visitors such as Trance Energy (RIP).

IMG_5370_heereveen

Boarnsterhim

The first municipality with a real Frisian name. Boornsterhem (its Dutch name) ceased to exist at the beginning of 2014, when it was divided over Leeuwarden, Heereveen, Súdwest-Fryslân and De Friese Meren, because of its poor financial status.

It is named after the river Boorn (cf. the Dutch bron, “spring”), and him, which means residence.

IMG_5384_boarnsterhim

Leeuwarden

Home (and start and finish) of the Elfstedentocht, a 200km long skating tour with over 16k participants, leading past all eleven historical cities of the province. Every winter it’s the same story: is it cold enough to grow at least 15cm of natural ice along the entire course? Sometimes years in a row the match cannot be held due to the lack of ice thickness; The last three races were in ’85, ’86 and ’97. But, if the ice is thick enough, you’ll surely hear it on every medium; the race is then announced and starts within 48 hours.IMG_5397_leeuwarden

Leeuwarderadeel

Over the years Leeuwarderadeel has been giving up villages to Leeuwarden. Since the middle ages Leeuwarderadeel has been independent from Leeuwarden, but in 2018 they will reunite.

IMG_5409_leeuwarderadeel

Ferwerderadiel

In 2008 the newspaper Algemeen Dagblad declared Ferwerderadiel to be the safest municipality of the Netherlands. The list of 2010 even contained 7 top-10 positions for municipalities from Frisia.

If I’m correct it’s the first municipality with a Wadden Sea coast line. Also, it’s the smallest of the province, in terms of population.

IMG_5413_ferweradiel

Het Bildt

One of the eldest polders, and the name also refers to the reclamation (ca 1400) of land: it is derived from opgebild, which means something like dredged soil. In Frisia most place names are in Frisian, and in smaller font in Dutch. But in Het Bildt all place names are in Dutch and the Bild dialect.

IMG_5427_hetbildt

Menameradiel

IMG_5431_menderadiel

Franekeradeel

If you are ever around, visit the Eisinga Planetarium. It houses a 18th-century orrery, built by Eise Eisinga. It’s a small museum these days, but very interesting.

IMG_5458_frankeradeel

This was day 1 of two days (remember, I went camping…). In the next post, there will be 6 more Frisian municipalities.


km: 264
km total: 4319
done: 9 (117)
to do: 298

KML-LogoFullscreen-Logo
Trip 19 FR

loading map - please wait...

Boarnsterhim: 53.095933, 5.834387
Heereveen: 52.961551, 5.920902
Leeuwarden: 53.202229, 5.796034
Gaasterlân-Sleat: 52.970399, 5.790391
Súdwest-Fryslân: 53.032497, 5.659043
Skarsterlân: 52.898839, 5.583474
Weststellingerwerf: 52.876321, 6.006827
Harlingen: 53.175066, 5.417971
Lemsterland: 52.844065, 5.711644
Leeuwarderadeel: 53.260631, 5.758453
Ferwerderadiel: 53.337674, 5.823678
Het Bildt: 53.277281, 5.661588
Menameradiel: 53.217420, 5.661253
Franekeradeel: 53.184876, 5.531771
Littenseradiel: 53.107787, 5.588033
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Menameradiel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Harlingen
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Súdwest-Fryslân
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Lemsterland
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Littenseradiel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Skarsterlân
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Gaasterlân-Sleat
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Weststellingerwerf
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Heereveen
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Boarnsterhim
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Leeuwarden
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Leeuwarderadeel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Ferwerderadiel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Het Bildt
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Franekeradeel

Sorry for the silence

This post marks a one-year silence. Normally this indicates that nothing has happened in that year, but this is far from the truth. Last year I’d visited 108 municipalities in total. Currently, the score is about 164.

The maps have been updated, and I already posted the photos there. My new goal is to get rid of the backlog (5 trips, 56 municipalities, and some-thousands of kilometers) this year, and start fresh in 2015.

Naarden

A sneak preview of Naarden and my fluo pink (although it looks some sort of orange on pictures) rims.

Day 18 – Dronten, Noordoostpolder, Urk, Lelystad, Almere, Zeewolde

Another interesting day. Not only because this was probably the worst weather I’ve driven in so far. Even worse than driving through the snowstorm (okay, that might be pushing it a little) on Day 11. There was wind over 8 bft, so much rain that cars would stop, in the evening there was enough lightning that would regularly light the sky, and on the way back the highway was covered white with pieces of hail. But, although I was completely wet, even all my underwear, it was a nice ride, with beautiful scenery. Especially the rain showers in the distance where a beautiful sight.

But another reason is that Flevoland is probably the only province that can be done in one day, especially now the days are getting shorter. With 6 municipalities, and 4 of them on the same island, it was a nice trip.

Dronten

Dronten is a relatively young municipality, as are the other municipalities in Flevoland. In 1962 the first inhabitants arrived, and immediately there was a discussion whether it should become a town or a city.

During the preparations of Dronten, remainings of aeroplanes from WW2 were found. On the photo you can see the memorial that they built to commemmorate the victims.Dronten

Noordoostpolder

Noordoostpolder is the municipality with the largest area of the Netherlands (not if you also consider water bodies). The municipality also holds the newest town in the Netherlands: Schokland, a former island, before they impoldered the area. Not a very large town though, as there are only 4 housekeepings, a museum, a restaurant, and the house of the light guard.
All the towns in Noordoostpolder are named after former towns, before the impoldering. At least for me it’s quite difficult to imagine driving on a road, where not even 100 years ago, the sea was destroying towns. Quite some nifty engineering.Noordoostpolder

Urk

Urk, another one of those former islands. Until 1939 it was an island, and in 1942 when the Noordoostpolder was impoldered, it became part of the main land. However, the inhabitants still considered themselves to live on an island: they don’t say in Urk, but on Urk. Also, it is one of the most devout municipalities with a close community. This becomes apparent in their genes as well. Because the community was so close-knit, they also married within this community. Hence, the Urkers have many heritable diseases. For example the disease of Van Buchem is only known for people with roots in Urk.Urk

Lelystad

The first inhabitants arrived in late 1967 and in 1980 Lelystad became a municipality. Until 1986 Lelystad was not part of a province. The city, municipality, the province, and an important pumping station, are named after the godfather of the Zuiderzeewerken, Cornelis Lely. Lelystad is the third polder, and knew a steady incline of inhabitants. Only after the fourth polder was finished, Almere, there was a strong decline, of people moving to Almere, since it was closer to Amsterdam and het Gooi, especially for the commuters. (The fifth polder was never realised) But now, there are living people again, and it seems to be thriving.Lelystad

Almere

Although for a moment Almere was the biggest city in Flevoland, Lelystand has regained that title. But still, it is in the top-10 of largest municipalities of the Netherlands.Almere

On my way to Zeewolde I saw a nice opportunity for a panorama. Too bad I suck at taking them, otherwise this could have been a very nice picture.

Oostvaardersdijk

Zeewolde

Zeewolde became an independent municipality in 1984, and is the youngest municipality that is not the result of fusing.

I’m still not completely used to the days getting shorter. When I’m working it seems to get gradually darker, but on the road, all of a sudden it’s dark.Zeewolde

I also really like their flag:

Original by Quistnix. Click on the image for more info.


km: 346
km total: 4055
done: 6 (108)
to do: 307

KML-LogoFullscreen-Logo
Flevoland

loading map - please wait...

Zeewolde: 52.331749, 5.544752
Urk: 52.663579, 5.602007
Noordoostpolder: 52.709717, 5.747583
Lelystad: 52.507778, 5.475771
Dronten: 52.523737, 5.716505
Almere: 52.371769, 5.221452
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Dronten
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Noordoostpolder
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Urk
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Lelystad
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Almere
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Zeewolde

Day 17 – Alphen aan den Rijn, Rijnwoude, Boskoop

This post celebrates the 100th visited municipality. And since the days are getting shorter again, this means we are approaching the end of the year. In turn, this means that some municipalities are undergoing some changes. Today’s trip is about three of these municipalities: Alphen aan den Rijn, Rijnwoude, and Boskoop. They will fuse the first of January into Alphen aan den Rijn.

In 2008 there were talks that Boskoop and Rijnwoude could fuse on a voluntary basis in 2011. Many municipalities were approached, but none of them wanted to collaborate. A study showed that fusing would even be financially malignant for Rijnwoude.
Fast-forward to 2010. This time the provincial executive took the command, and involved the municipality Alphen aan den Rijn into the discussions. This time the negociations were effective, and two and a half years later, they are finally going to fuse.

This is not the end of the story. The inhabitants were able to elect a name from a set of names, weighted according to the number of inhabitants. The winner was the name “Rijn en Gouweland”. However, Alphen aan den Rijn did not acknowledge the chosen name. Now Boskoop and Rijnwoude are quite offended, and unanimously stated a motion of no confidence. They say using the name Alphen aan den Rijn makes it look more like an incorporation, rather than a fusion. The minister of the interior is asked to solve this matter. In the meanwhile, the working name of the municipality is abr. To be continued :)

Alphen aan den Rijn

After a quite uneventful trip with slow traffic and overtaking being prohibited on the provincial roads, I arrived in Alphen aan den Rijn. Come to think of it, there are many places called Alphen in the Netherlands. At least every important river has one (Alphen aan den Rijn, Alphen aan de Maas, Alphen aan de Lek). The fact that all Alphens are close to the water is no surprise, since this is explained by its name. It originates from the Germanic alf, which means water course. There is also another explanation which says that the name come from alv, which means calcareous sandy soil. But this is not true for all Alphens, so I don’t know. I like the first one better.

Alphen aan den Rijn

Rijnwoude

Rijnwoude

 

Boskoop

Internationally known for its tree nurseries, Boskoop is a middle-large town in Zuid-Holland. Although Boskoop is located on a thick layer of peat, in contrast to its surrounding towns and villages, winning turf was never one of its main activities. The ground was found to be very suitable for tree nursery. For centuries they dedicated themselves to the cultivation of fruit and fruit trees (in particular apples). One of the only cooking apples available in the Netherlands is the goudreinette, originally known as the schone van Boskoop (beauty of Boskoop). The apples are not particularly beautiful, but the texture and taste are exquisite, and perfect for cooking.

Boskoop


km: 305
km total: 3709
done: 3 (102)
to do: 313

KML-LogoFullscreen-Logo
Day 17 ZH

loading map - please wait...

Alphen aan den Rijn: 52.129308, 4.659516
Rijnwoude: 52.129012, 4.588820
Boskoop: 52.074813, 4.656901
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Alphen aan den Rijn
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Rijnwoude
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Boskoop

Day 13 – Voorst, Apeldoorn, Epe, Heerde, Hattem, Oldebroek, Elburg, Nunspeet, Harderwijk

Since some stupid stomach flu keeps me homebound this week, I used the opportunity to post an unposted trip: day 13, in the north-west of Gelderland. This trip dates from already quite a while back, 29 March 2013, when time was more abundant :)

Harderwijk

Started as a small settlement Herderewich, it gained importance in the thirteenth century after gaining town privileges. From 1648 through 1811 there was a university known for its promovendi such as Carolus Linnaeus. Nowadays Harderwijk is famous for the largest marine mammal park in Europe.

Although I drive through Harderwijk quite often to get to one of our favourite windsurfing spots, I have never actually been into the centre, which still accomodates some old architecture.

Harderwijk

Nunspeet

The name Nunspeet is derived from Nuwenspete which means “new reclamation”. The opposite is the village Elspeet in the same municipality, which means “old reclamation”.

Initially, the area was quite harsh to inhabit. In the 20th century they afforested the area, to avoid sand drift.

Nunspeet

Elburg

This is the third municipality in row directly connected to the Veluwemeer. For centuries the old town hall was located in the historical centre of the town. However, I couldn’t get there by bike, hence I only have this picture of this new poor-looking town hall. The heraldic symbol on the outside looks nice and shiny though.

There is a lot of sight-seeing to do in the centre, with old architecture and a large ditch around the town centre.

Although Jan Tuttel thinks that the El in Elburg and Elspeet have different meanings, he is not decisive. I think the reasoning of the INL is fair, with El referring to old (as for Elspeet), and burg to stronghold.

Elburg

Oldebroek

The name does not mean old pants (broek means pants), but broek is a variant of burcht, as we also saw in Elburg. The coat arms of Oldebroek is quite funny, as it’s been drawn  by a child:

Coat arms of Oldebroek. Click on the image to follow the source.

It depicts a silver shield with three alder leaves of vert.

Oldebroek

Hattem

Apparently, in 1989 Hattem was the only Dutch city to receive the European predicate “Best kept village”. Although I cannot find a true source for it. If you know of any, let me now.

It is without a doubt one of the nicest town halls I’ve visited so far. The aura, the colours, the only thing lacking is some steps :)

Hattem

Heerde

When I was taking pictures a squirrel appeared. I followed it for a while, but I lost it.

Heerde

Epe

The area around Epe, especially around Vaassen, contains celtic fields (raatakkers in Dutch) dating from the iron age. There appears to be a very active community that charts all historical events, and has a very detailed timeline of the municipality: http://www.ampt-epe.nl/historie.

Epe

Voorst

The name Voorst occurs in at least eight accountable places in the Netherlands, and in many more derivations (e.g. Voorsttonden). An English reader can recognise the English forest in Voorst. In the middle ages a forst or foreest was an area consisting of forest, fields and lands, especially in a hunting context. For a more detailed etymologic interpretation, see the same linked document.

Voorst

Apeldoorn

The last municipality is also the biggest. It comprises the village Radio Kootwijk. Named after the broadcasting station with the same name.

Apeldoorn


km: 250
km total: 2599
done: 9 (71)
to do: 344

KML-LogoFullscreen-Logo
Day 13 GE

loading map - please wait...

Voorst: 52.236701, 6.109722
Apeldoorn: 52.215610, 5.963549
Epe: 52.349230, 5.986023
Heerde: 52.388646, 6.042876
Hattem: 52.474317, 6.069948
Oldebroek: 52.445966, 5.899551
Elburg: 52.441907, 5.855395
Nunspeet: 52.376737, 5.784068
Harderwijk: 52.351995, 5.622512
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Harderwijk
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Nunspeet
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Elburg
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Oldebroek
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Hattem
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Heerde
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Epe
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Voorst
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Apeldoorn

Day 16 – Opheusden, Buren, Tiel, Culemborg, Lingewaal, Geldermalsen, Neerijnen, Zaltbommel, Maasdriel

The next couple of posts will not be in chronological order. I’m a bit lagging with uploading the pictures here, and insert some random comment alongside of it. The pictures are always uploaded very quickly to the facebook photo album. They will also be posted here, but there might be a short delay. More like an apology for mainly the Google spider, all my favourite Russian spammers, and for the few human readers 😉

Today there was a fair in Nijmegen, and to avoid all the busyness, I decided to (almost) round up the province Gelderland, and head for the west.

Neder-Betuwe

First in line, the municipality Neder-Betuwe, located in Opheusden. Neder-Betuwe is also the name of the region. In Dodewaard, one of the towns, the nuclear reactor plant with a boiling water reactor has been decommisioned. Although it has been out of service for over 15 years, it will not be completely removed and demolished because they have to wait for the radioactive decay. With a 40-year waiting period of safe enclosure, the plant is expected to be demolished in 2045.

Neder-Betuwe

Buren

The town centre of Buren, is also called the “gemeentepaleis”, the town palace. According to the architects the design of the town hall is inspired by organic architecture. It costed almost 16m euro.

Buren

The town hall is indeed huge, but 16m euro? Decide for yourself. Besides that, the surrounding park costed an additional 2m euro.

Tiel

Although I didn’t take the effort to take pictures of the centre itself, I can really recommend it if you like old buildings and architecture. There are a lot of buildings with inner courts that you can look into, and the general atmosphere just feels historic.

On the other hand, the town hall is nothing like that 😉 You should see the contrast for yourself, with the buildings at the other side of the street.

Tiel

Culemborg

Culemborg, formerly known as Kuilenburg, was a free state where the laws of Holland were not observed. As long as the debtor remained in Kuilenburg, the creditor was not allowed to enter the city. The Dutch saying “naar Kuilenburg gaan”, going to Kuilenburg, means withdrawing oneself from responsibilities, or going bankrupt.

Culemborg

Yes, the the revolving door was indeed closed, and although the rest is just glass, they must have thought that protecting the entrance was sufficient :)

Lingewaal

Another municipality in the Tielerwaard is Lingewaal. The area is very sparsely populated and rural. The town hall is hidden behind a residential area.

Lingewaal

Geldermalsen

On my way to the town hall of Geldermalsen in the equally named town, I passed the village Acquoy. I was doubting how to pronounce it. Some research on the internet shows that I am not the only one. I too thought it would be pronounced the French way, but apparently it is ‘akkooi’, and not ‘akwoi’, and definitely not ‘akkwah’ (I don’t speak IPA 😉 ). The next thought was, what does it mean? At home I learned that -oy (and similar suffices like -ooy, -oyen, -au, and -auwen) often indicate the presence of a forest on a river bank.

Geldermalsen

Neerijnen

The town hall of Neerijnen is beautiful with its moat, and green surroundings. A environment worthy of a castle.

Neerijnen

And the obligatory self-shot.

Neerijnen

Zaltbommel

Similar to the town hall of Neerijnen, the municipal office of Zaltbommel is not reachable with the motorcycle. Although in the first case I could understand it in some way. In the case of Zaltbommel I was rather surprised as the office is on an industrial area.

An interesting historical fact about the city is in its name. Zalt-bommel means the salty orchard. It originates from the time where the sea would have influence on the saltiness of the soil, through the river the Waal, before the direct connection between the river and the sea was closed. However, fruit trees don’t grow in salty soil, so…

Zaltbommel

Maasdriel

Originally the name of municipality was Driel, but the Germans changed it in 1944 to Maasdriel, to avoid confusing it with Driel near Heteren. If you understand Dutch, this page has a nice argumentative etymologic breakdown for Driel.

Maasdriel


km: 235
km total: 3404
done: 9 (99)
to do: 316

KML-LogoFullscreen-Logo
Day 16 GE

loading map - please wait...

Buren: 51.956366, 5.424756
Culemborg: 51.957021, 5.227756
Geldermalsen: 51.881842, 5.282036
Maasdriel: 51.771205, 5.337812
Neder-Betuwe: 51.933508, 5.630173
Neerijnen: 51.832746, 5.280540
Tiel: 51.885843, 5.434540
Zaltbommel: 51.799366, 5.257047
Lingewaal: 51.882455, 5.111625
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Neder-Betuwe
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Buren
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Tiel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Culemborg
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Geldermalsen
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Neerijnen
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Lingewaal
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Zaltbommel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Maasdriel

Day 12 – Mook & Middelaar, Gennep, Bergen, Beesel, Peel & Maas, Horst aan de Maas, Venray

This is a placeholder with only the pics. One of my favourite pictures so far is the last but one. If only I weren’t such a snapshit photographer :)

Mook en Middelaar

 

Mook en Middelaar

Gennep

 

2013-02-17 13.32.46_rot

Bergen

 

2013-02-17 13.51.16

Beesel

 

Beesel

Peel en Maas

 

Peel en Maas

Horst aan de Maas

 

Horst aan de Maas Horst aan de Maas

Venray

 

Venray Venray


km: 200
km total: 2349
done: 7 (62)
to do: 353

KML-LogoFullscreen-Logo
Day 12

loading map - please wait...

Mook: 51.751023, 5.881201
Gennep: 51.830135, 5.921803
Beesel: 51.283682, 6.077667
Bergen: 51.603106, 6.049384
Peel en Maas: 51.329784, 5.978585
Horst aan de Maas: 51.454812, 6.053341
Venray: 51.529008, 5.976147
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Mook
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Gennep
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Beesel
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Peel en Maas
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Horst aan de Maas
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Venray
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Bergen

Day 10 – Oss, Maasdonk, Bernheze, Uden, Landerd, Grave

This post was promised a while back already. I can hardly believe this was the 31st of January.

Oss

A small city in Noord-Brabant is known for the Gang of Oss which is a turbulent period from 1888 through 1934 in which criminals committed many severe crimes. Over 160 people were arrested in 1934 were round up. Nowadays it’s not as bad.

Oss

Somewhere along the way I made these two pictures. The scenery might be basic, but that’s also one of the things about driving around, learning to appreciate it.

2013-01-31 15.26.40 2013-01-31 15.26.34-rot1

Maasdonk

A 2008 survey showed that majority of Maasdonk’s inhabitants were fine with the idea of removal of the municipality. In 2012 a proposal to merge with Bernheze was also dismissed. Other negotiations are still ongoing, but are not fruitful yet.

I think this is the first -donk municipality of more to come. A donk is a elevation in a boggy area. Maas- is obviously derived from the river, which is at the heart of the area, and which caused both prosperity and misfortune.

Maasdonk

Bernheze

Maasdonk is the result of a fusion of municipalities in 1993. Bernheze is only one year younger, and it initiality was named after its biggest town. Now, it’s named after a promoninent farm stead of the old days. Bern stands for born, which means as much as source, or water. Hese stands for woods. Seems to me like an accurate description of the area, even now.

Bernheze

Uden

We are not really used to earthquakes in the Netherlands, but in 1932, one of the heaviest earthquakes had its epicenter in Uden, and following the Mercalli intensity scale, it reached a level VI. Only in 1992 a stronger earthquake (VII) was observed in Roermond.

Uden

Landerd

Another fairly new municipality (1994). Although in itself it is not very known, for us mainly Zeeland is a famous place. Not because there is anything to do (except for visiting the town hall), but because it’s also the name of a province. So you can go quite far, in little time.

Landerd

Grave

One of the major pathways to get into Noord-Brabant. Or anything south of the Maas, for that matter. The municipality was formed in the Napoleonic time, concurrently to the founding of a fortified town Grave. Etymologically, Grave derived its name from graven (digging) or gracht (moat).

King Willem-Alexander uses the title Baron van de stad Grave en het Land van Cuijk (Baron of the city Grave and the land of Cuijk).2013-01-31 17.06.23


km: 95
km total: 2107
done: 6 (50)
to to: 365

KML-LogoFullscreen-Logo
Day 10

loading map - please wait...

Oss: 51.764635, 5.524747
Maasdonk: 51.740388, 5.461692
Bernheze: 51.734512, 5.527058
Uden: 51.656569, 5.617202
Landerd: 51.696332, 5.673534
Grave: 51.760109, 5.734831
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Oss
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Maasdonk
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Bernheze
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Uden
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Landerd
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Grave

Day 15 – Doesburg, Rijnwaarden, Zevenaar, Duiven

Finally an update again! After having my motorcycle torn apart for weeks, it was good to have a proper ride again.

I had some issues with my clutch and incoming shaft of my gearbox. We had to remove everything, essentially only leaving the engine in its place.

So, town centers. It was a sunny sunday afternoon, and I was still recovering from some nights with little sleep, but there was also this anticipation of getting on the road again. There were some town centers nearby that I hadn’t visited before: Rijnwaarden, Doesburg, Didam, Zevenaar, and Duiven.

Since Rijnwaarden is difficult to reach, being in a corner between the river Waal and the German border, it seemed like a huge detour. And to avoid having to ride back and forth on the same route, I decided to visit the municipality Doesburg first.

Doesburg

Doesburg is one of the 16 hanseatic towns in the IJssel and South Sea area and later became part of the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands. Initially the place is called Duisburg, as the German city which is still known as such. The town center of Doesburg is apparently famous, or to say, the part of the town center depicted on the right of the picture is famous, most notably for its impressive wine stock. But there were people all over the place enjoying the weather and looking at me funny, so I took a picture of the current entrance.

Doesburg

Rijnwaarden

Then I went of to Lobith, where the town hall of Rijnwaarden is located. On the way I already saw directions to all other municipalities I was to visit. But I stuck to my plan :)

Rijnwaarden

Because of the responsibilities municipalities will have to bear the first of January 2015, there is a lot of discussion about a possible fusion. For Rijnwaarden this is no different. The political parties are looking at the possibilities of a fusion with Rijnwaarden, Zevenaar, Duiven, and Westervoort. One party (PvdA) wants to include Didam as well, however, that city is currently part of another municipality (Montferland). This soap is going to be continued.

Zevenaar

Next stop, Zevenaar. Not much to say about this town.

Zevenaar

Duiven

Now a town of which I rarely visit the centre, but only get to the peripheral commercial zone, since the nearest IKEA is located there. Duiven used to be a small and quiet town, until the board of province decided that it needed to grow, as to accommodate commuters for larger cities as Arnhem and Velp. Now, it is known as a sleeping municipality because everyone leaves to work in the morning, and returns in the evening.

Duiven

I also returned home in the evening, but fortunately not to Duiven.


km: 120
km total: 3169
done: 4 (90)
to do: 325

KML-LogoFullscreen-Logo
Day 15 GE

loading map - please wait...

Doesburg: 52.015224, 6.133738
Duiven: 51.948659, 6.024744
Rijnwaarden: 51.860025, 6.119809
Zevenaar: 51.928452, 6.075839
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Doesburg
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Rijnwaarden
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Zevenaar
icon-car.png Fullscreen-Logo KML-Logo
Duiven